Talk it Out

For You

If you are in a Crisis, Connect with a Professional Now

Tell them you are having suicidal thoughts and be honest.

If You're Struggling with Suicidal Thoughts

Open up

Have an honest conversation with someone you trust. While it may be difficult to open up, sharing your feelings is one of the most powerful things you can do for your mental health. Not sure what to say?

Connect with a
professional

Your feelings can improve with treatment and support. NEMHC is available where it is most convenient – in our office, via Zoom, over the phone. We can help regardless of your ability to pay.

Limit social media

While social media allows us a way to stay connected if it’s creating more anxiety and insecurity than serenity and confidence, back off your usage and consider discontinuing it entirely.

You are not alone.

One in five young adults is currently experiencing a mental health condition.

Take care of yourself

Do things that make you feel good, mentally and physically – go outside, exercise, enjoy a hobby and get plenty of sleep.

There is Hope

Suicidal thoughts are a symptom, just like any other — they can be treated, and they can improve over time. Start talking about your mental health, it’s okay.

Your mental health impacts how you think, feel, and behave. Like your physical health, your mental health can be good or bad, and that may change over the course of your life – it is on a continuum.

Talk it Out

Get Help from a Trusted Adult

Not Sure What to Say?

When you’ve connected with a friend or a trusted adult it can be hard to find the right words.

Friends Talking
Talk about not only the things affecting you, but how they are affecting you. Share how your thoughts, feelings, mood, behaviors, sleep or energy levels are impacted. Share your timeline of struggle in weeks/months or hours/days. Think about what makes you feel better so your friend knows how to support you.

Conversation Starters

Not comfortable starting the
conversation in person?

Send a text. Just start the conversation.

Vulnerability Hangover

Oofff, you just had a very honest conversation that may make you self-conscience. Reach back out to say you appreciate their willingness to talk. This can break the ice and sends the signal you’re open to continued conversation.

Not the Reaction You Expected?

If you don’t feel like you were taken seriously but were told that you’ll get over it, find someone else to talk to. Not everyone understands the seriousness of your situation but you will find someone who does.

If a Friend Has Suicidal Thoughts

If you are worried about someone’s safety, find a trusted adult to help immediately.
You wouldn’t try to fix a friend’s broken arm; this is no different.
Friend Helping Cope

Get Help from a Trusted Adult

How You Can Help

Conversation Starters

Talk it Out
counselor talking
Talk it Out

During Your Conversation

Do

  • Listen without judgment
  • Ask “how can I help?”
  • Validate their feelings
  • Be patient

Don't

  • Interrupt or speak over
  • Tell them how they should feel
  • Jump in with solutions
  • Be critical or blaming
Respect their choice if they’re not immediately ready to talk and be ready when they are. Having conversations can lead to connections with mental health professionals.

What If Scenarios

To avoid making a promise, don’t make one. Instead say, “I can do that unless there’s something that makes me really worried about you. I’m always here for you and can go with you to get help, if it’s helpful.”

Their safety is more important. You played a role in finding them help.
Share your own struggles and continue to support them. Help them make a connection to someone who can help. If they still won’t open up and you’re genuinely concerned they may harm themselves, reach out to a trusted adult for help. Even if pulling in an adult frustrates your friend, eventually they’ll understand you were looking out for their well-being and if they don’t, know you still made the right choice to save their life.

Take care of yourself and know your own limits. If it weighs on your mind daily and is stressing you out, talk to a trusted adult.

To avoid making a promise, don’t make one. Instead, “I can do that unless there’s something that makes me really worried about you. I’m always here for you and can go with you to get help, if it’s helpful.”
Their safety is more important. You played a role in finding them help.
Share your own struggles and continue to support them. Help them make a connection to someone who can help. If they still won’t open up and you’re genuinely concerned they may harm themselves, reach out to a trusted adult for help. Even if pulling in an adult frustrates your friend, eventually they’ll understand you were looking out for their well-being and if they don’t, know you still made the right choice to save their life.
Take care of yourself and know your own limits. If it’s weighs on your mind daily and is stressing you out, talk to a trusted adult.

After the Conversation

Their struggles likely won’t end after one conversation. Continue to support them, even if it’s just to check in or send a text. Handle their trust with care, do not gossip. Getting help from a trusted adult to navigate the situation is not gossip, you also need to take care of yourself.

Talking about suicide won't plant the idea.

Your words have power. You can save a life.

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24/7 Crisis Resources

There will be no charge for you to reach out to any of these resources.

Call NEMHC

605-229-1000

Call National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

800-273-8255

Text TALK to

741741

For LGBTQ young people

Call Trevor Suicide Prevention Lifeline 866-488-7386

Chat at trevorchat.org

Text START to 678678